1. #herewegoagain #bday #movingon

    #herewegoagain #bday #movingon

  2. gograndriders:

    New York, New York, Here We Come!

    Go Grandriders Open Friday October 25-31, 2013 at QUAD CINEMA

    Showtimes Daily 1:05, 4:40 & 8:40PM

    Voted best documentary by the audience at this year’s Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF) in New York, and winner of the Balinale International Film Festival, Go Grandriders is coming to the Big Apple for its official theatrical release in the East Coast. This is also to fulfill the requirement for the film’s oscar quest. This would be the first documentary from Taiwan that has ever made it to the Oscar qualification by completing theatrical releases.

    We would not have come this far without your support! Please invite your friends in New York area to come out and watch it! Spread the words for us! Help make Go Grandriders’ New York screening a big success!

    QUAD CINEMA

    34 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011

    Phone: 212-255-8800

    E-mail: quadcinema@aol.com

    Read Reviews:

    The Village Voice

    Los Angeles Times

    The Hollywood Reporter

    Variety

  3. art-of-swords:

    Combination of Katar Dagger & Flintlock Pistol

    • Dated: probably 18th century
    • Culture: Indian
    • Medium: steel, brass, gold

    Source: Copyright © 2013 Historical Arms & Armor

  4. Progression of ladies’ fashion from 1785-1820. (Roughly the years of Jane Austen’s life.)

    From the original post:

    Sketches are from John Peacock’s book: Costume 1066 – 1966, A Complete Guide to English Costume Design and History (copyrighted 1986). Mr. Peacock was the senior costume designer for BBC Television when the book was printed.”

    From the top 1785-1798, 1798-1800, 1800-1811, 1811-1820.

    Attributed to the blog carla-at-home.

  5. orientallyyours:

    Posters for the “雙妹” (Two Girls) line of Hong Kong cosmetics brand, 廣生行 (Kwong Sang Hong Ltd.) from the 1930s. Kwong Sang Hong was the first registered cosmetic company, founded in 1898 by a young scientist, Fung Fook Tien to provide fine cosmetics for the average woman. The origin of the “Two Girls” name is said to have been sparked by a stroll through a park when Fung encountered two beautiful women in sparkling white dresses. When he asked them if he was witnessing a visit by angels, they replied, “We’re simply two girls.”

    Source: Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology- 1, 2, 3

  6. #brooklyn #sunset

    #brooklyn #sunset

  7. afghanistaninphotos:

    Traditional Dresses of Afghanistan 

  8. Crab and rice cake…Shanghai style #yum

    Crab and rice cake…Shanghai style #yum

  9. art-of-swords:

The Dadao Sword
The dadao literally meaning “big knife” is one of the varieties of dao or Chinese saber, is also known as the Chinese great sword. Based on agricultural knives, the dadao has a broad blade generally between two and three feet long, with lengthy hilts meant for “hand and a half” or two-handed use, and generally a weight-forward balance.
Some were made for military use, but they were most commonly associated with civilian militias or revolutionaries since there was essentially no learning curve needed to be able to use it. While not a particularly sophisticated sword, the weight and balance of the dadao gave it considerable slashing and chopping power, making it an effective close combat weapon for untrained troops.
A military marching song, the Dadao March, was composed to become the rally cry for Chinese troops throughout the Second Sino-Japanese war to glorify the use of dadao during battle with the invaders. In origin, design, and use, the dadao is broadly comparable to the European “Großes Messer” and falchion. However, the dadao was also commonly used by executioners for beheadings. 
Also spelled ‘Da Dao’ this sword was made famous by the 29th Army of the Chinese Nationalist Army fighting against the Japanese invaders during the 1930s. Legend has it that this weapon was so effective that heads could be cut off with ease. The 29th Army fought and held their position for 7 days and 7 nights at Xifengkou, killing 3000 enemies.
However, in the 500 elite soldiers of the ‘Da Dao Dui’ meaning “Big-Saber Contingent”, only 20 survived. On 9th March 1933, Jin En-Zhong was assigned the Northwest Army’s “Big-Saber Contingent”. Subsequently on June 1933, he published ‘Shi yong Da Dao Shu’, “Practical Big-Saber Techniques”. 

Source: Book : “An Introduction to Chinese Single-Edged Hilt Weapons (Dao) and Their Use in the Ming and Qing Dynasties” by Philip Tom | Chinese Longsword

    art-of-swords:

    The Dadao Sword

    The dadao literally meaning “big knife” is one of the varieties of dao or Chinese saber, is also known as the Chinese great sword. Based on agricultural knives, the dadao has a broad blade generally between two and three feet long, with lengthy hilts meant for “hand and a half” or two-handed use, and generally a weight-forward balance.

    Some were made for military use, but they were most commonly associated with civilian militias or revolutionaries since there was essentially no learning curve needed to be able to use it. While not a particularly sophisticated sword, the weight and balance of the dadao gave it considerable slashing and chopping power, making it an effective close combat weapon for untrained troops.

    A military marching song, the Dadao March, was composed to become the rally cry for Chinese troops throughout the Second Sino-Japanese war to glorify the use of dadao during battle with the invaders. In origin, design, and use, the dadao is broadly comparable to the European “Großes Messer” and falchion. However, the dadao was also commonly used by executioners for beheadings. 

    Also spelled ‘Da Dao’ this sword was made famous by the 29th Army of the Chinese Nationalist Army fighting against the Japanese invaders during the 1930s. Legend has it that this weapon was so effective that heads could be cut off with ease. The 29th Army fought and held their position for 7 days and 7 nights at Xifengkou, killing 3000 enemies.

    However, in the 500 elite soldiers of the ‘Da Dao Dui’ meaning “Big-Saber Contingent”, only 20 survived. On 9th March 1933, Jin En-Zhong was assigned the Northwest Army’s “Big-Saber Contingent”. Subsequently on June 1933, he published ‘Shi yong Da Dao Shu’, “Practical Big-Saber Techniques”. 

    Source: Book : “An Introduction to Chinese Single-Edged Hilt Weapons (Dao) and Their Use in the Ming and Qing Dynasties” by Philip Tom | Chinese Longsword